I see dead words: terms tech has left behind

GeekWirenewZombies walk among us. And you may encounter one when you open your mouth, if your talk references dated tech.

Over at GeekWire, I take to task some common terminology by examining its linguistic and technological origins. And, of course, I offer helpful alternatives for “cc:,” “dial a number,” “next slide” and two other terms.

However, there was a sixth “outdated” term that I had to dump before the column was submitted, because when I did further research, I discovered I (and others who had suggested it) were, well, wrong.

The original unedited text?

“Ditto” to something. We’ve all typed it or said it in utter shorthanded agreement: “ditto.” As in to duplicate. As in a Ditto (yes, proper noun) master.

Because Dittos were a 20th century technology for making – again, pre- cheap photocopy or computer – copies. They required typing or writing on a special Ditto master, with a dense waxy layer, often purple, on its reverse side. When the protective sheet was removed from the back of the master and the master was attached to a rotating drum, remarkably clear spirit fluid transferred whatever what was imprinted on the master to multiple sheets of paper, until the waxy substance was depleted and you only got faded duplicates.

I only say the spirit fluid was remarkable because it had certain properties I suspected that, if inhaled, would explain the behavior of those teachers I recall who hung around the machine much of the school day. And it was legal.

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3APerthGazette_1833_06_01_1_ditto.jpgThe only problem with this entire section? “Ditto” and the typographical mark which sports the same name date back to 1625 in English usage. It was not a term based on 20th century technology, but on centuries-older language and typography.

Of course, I only discovered this pesky reality after I’d drafted the column and was doing a final fact-check.

Facts: those double-edged swords that either provide the foundation, or the undoing, of a columnist’s work. Despite their annoying nature in this case, I still prefer relying on them.

Read, “I see dead words: Terminology that technology has left behind” over at GeekWire.

Lies my Fitbit tells me

GeekWirenewThose little tickles in the back of your mind that tell you a relationship may not be quite what you expected? I can no longer ignore them. They’re the lies my Fitbit tells me.

Over at GeekWire, I analyze my “relationship” with my Fitbit Zip (after I lost 25 pounds using the MyFitnessPal app), and find it lacking based on battery life, accuracy and, well, expectations.

In the lively comments, I’m taken to task about one flaw I cited:FitbitZip

“You’re getting too popular?” – Honestly? What sort of hipster crap is this? If a product works, it works, you’re not some special snowflake that deserves a unique fitness monitoring device. If you really want to feel unique, go back to doing it by hand.

To which I responded:

The problem is that Fitbit Zip’s actual battery life is half of what’s claimed, that questionable accuracy of fitness trackers is well-documented (even with regular step walking), and the popularity of many fitness trackers may be unearned based on realistic (or unrealistic) buyer expectations, and that’s why they’re “too popular.” Hipster suspicions aside.

I’ve got to be more careful with that “too popular” line in the future. Really, it’s “too popular based on expectations” or “too popular for perhaps the wrong reasons.”

Oh. And I’m not breaking up with my Fitbit. I think a little honesty is good in a relationship.

Read, “Lies my Fitbit tells me,” over at GeekWire.

Microsoft’s newest education strategy

GeekWirenewMicrosoft and education have an inconsistent and varied history. But Microsoft has waded into the education pool anew with its “Office Mix” add-in for PowerPoint.

Over at GeekWire, I took an advance look at the new — and free — tool. Essentially, it adds a ribbon to PowerPoint (the Office 2013 or Office 365 version is required) that allows educators to integrate tests, exercises, video, narration, and animation (for simulations, for example) within a PowerPoint file, then distribute the link to students so they can interact with the lesson on the web.

“But wait,” I hear you cry. “Couldn’t this also be used by NON-educators?”

Indeed. It’s free, and freely available. But in my interview with a Microsoft exec, he made it clear that education and instructors were the “North Star” for Office Mix as a key, and primary, audience.

Office Mix also marked Microsoft’s partnerships with two education content non-profits, CK-12 Foundation and Khan Academy. From a brief on EdSurge:

James Tynan of Khan Academy told EdSurge columnist Frank Catalano it’s not every Khan video or interactive exercise, but Mixers will have direct access to “pretty much all of the videos we have created” and a “significant chunk” of the exercises, numbering respectively in the thousands and hundreds.

Read, “Microsoft wades into education again with ‘Office Mix’ tool for PowerPoint,” at GeekWire. And check out the additional detail at Edsurge.

Edtech entrepreneur wannabe? It’s crowded

GeekWirenewYes, I’ve been in education technology for two decades. Yes, it occasionally exasperates as much as it delights. And yes, all of that was front-and-center at last month’s ASU+GSV Education Innovation Summit.

Over at GeekWire, I provide my take on the conference held in the Phoenix area. And offer three observations for would-be education entrepreneurs which might be summed up as:GSVslide

  • prepare for the bubble,
  • all “education” markets are not alike, and
  • learn at least a little bit of the decades of edtech history so you can ground yourself in customer expectations.

Not that anyone will actually listen.

Read, “An open letter to wannabe edtech entrepreneurs: Welcome to the crowd, ” over at GeekWire.

 

Phished, caught and embarassed

GeekWirenewNSA. Target. Heartbleed. All are potential breaches of our personal data that are beyond our control.

Then there’s individual stupidity. My stupidity, with my smartphone, and my personal data.

Over at GeekWire, I detail how I got reeled in by an automated survey smartphone phishing scam, one of the latest tricks in a never-ending game of bait-and-catch that evolves as rapidly as technology. And to think I got stung by this, even I avoided even the notorious “Windows tech support” phone scam earlier.

TMobilelocksmall

Learn from my public disclosure, details and dismay. Don’t fall for it. (For the record, T-Mobile was spectacularly helpful and polite in assisting me in securing my account with a verbal password and listening to me self-berate over my lapse.)

Read, “Phished! Lessons learned from my smartphone stumble,” at GeekWire.